ROYAL NIAGARA MILITARY INSTITUTE
PRESERVING OUR PAST    PROTECTING OUR FUTURE
POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER
While   combat   mortality   rates   have   been   dropping   exponentially   for   70   years,   disability claims   have   sky-rocketed.   The   present   day   army   experiences   deaths   at   only   a   third   the rate   of   its   Vietnam-era   predecessor,   but   claims   for   disability   have   increased   three   times more   than   then.   In   part,   the   opposing   trends   are   entirely   predictable:   medical   advances mean   severely   wounded   soldiers   survive   more   often,   but   then   may   need   life-long   care. The   American   and   Canadian   military   currently   have   the   highest   reported   PTSD   rate   in their   history.   Roughly   half   of   Iraq   and   Afghanistan   war   vets   have   applied   for   permanent PTSD   disability.   Yet   combat   troops   make   up   only   10   per   cent   of   the   army,   the   remaining 40 per cent have to be explained by something other than trauma caused by combat. The   answer   would   appear   to   be   that   contemporary   society   fails   to   properly   reintegrate those   who   suffer   danger   and   trauma   on   its   behalf   -   forgetting   the   sacrifices   made   by   these   men   and   women.   This   applies   not   only   to   soldiers but   also   emergency   personnel   and   other   civilians   as   well.   Most   soldiers   can   handle   a   lot   of   hardship,   but   what   is   harder   for   them   to   handle   is the   feeling   that   their   efforts   and   sacrifices   were   meaningless.   The   emotional   support   that   a   soldier   feels   as   part   of   a   military   unit   is   sadly   missed when they return home. It has been said that part of the trauma of war is leaving it. A 2015 Canadian Forces study found that deployment abroad was emerging as a significant risk factor in military suicides. Returning   home,   many   wounded   veterans   suffering   from   PTSD   find   civilian   jobs   hard   to   find.   instead   of   the   highly   therapeutic   effect   of   being able to work and contribute to society, these vets are left with a void in their lives. Unable to find work, their lives lack meaning and direction.
CND FORCES STUDY CND FORCES STUDY HELP FOR PTSD HELP FOR PTSD